Party Accused of Running Illegal Cock Fighting Ring Could Face Hefty Fine

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Wednesday, June 29, 2011 - 8:38am

They rarely come across crimes of this nature within the city limits, but when they do, prosecutors want to send the message that it's not tolerated.

A Brownsville family could face a hefty fine after being caught running an illegal cock fighting operation.

A meeting to determine what needs to be done with over two dozen fighting roosters and to face the consequences had to be reset Tuesday morning after the woman accused of running an illegal cock fighting ring did not initially show up for her scheduled hearing with a Brownsville Municipal Prosecutor.

When she did show up she told the prosecutor she had gotten rid of the roosters. She also claimed the birds were not her own but her son's who is now in prison. The office will work with her to straighten out the situation; animal control will check in to make sure the roosters are actually gone. As of now another hearing has been set for next week.

It was an accidental finding two weeks ago.

Brownsville Code Enforcement officers were looking for violations of tall grass, junk cars and dumped trash.

When writing one of the citations for a junk car on this property, the officer spotted several roosters running lose in the backyard.

The officer called in Animal Control Officers to take a closer look. In the backyard they didn't actually find the roosters fighting, but evidence that that's what they were used for.

"This kind of thing needs to be stopped because it's cruelty to animals," said Brownsville Municipal Prosecutor John Chosy.

Training tools, a scale, and fighting blades were among some of the things found in a shed on the property.

A finding like this is rare for the city of Brownsville, officials said this is only the second of its kind in a little over a year, but not something that the city takes lightly.

"What I've encouraged the Animal Control people to do is, for example in this case, I think in this case there were like 20 roosters and chickens involved, that's 20 counts and so the maximum fine would be 20 times 500 dollars," suggested the prosecutor.

A potentially ten thousand dollar fine is what the owner of the roosters is up against, but Chosy said they do work out deals with people. A definite part of the agreement will be that the owner gets rid of the roosters, which she said she's done, and that no one in the home operates anything like this ever again.

The prosecutor's office hopes hefty fines like the one that could be imposed in this specific case will act as a deterrent for others who consider running one of these illegal operations.
 

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