Campaign Trail: The Final Debate

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Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 8:54am

President Obama and Mitt Romney spar over foreign policy issues in the final debate before the election.

If you missed it last night, the last presidential debate is over with a clear winner according to the overnight polls, but no clear answer on whether either candidate is any closer to winning the election.

Two post-debate polls this morning give this one to President Obama. CNN says he won it by 8 points. CBS put him 30 points ahead of Governor Romney. But a whopping 60% also said Romney is capable of being commander in chief.

This debate was more engaging than the first debate, and less contentious than the last. The President's strategy seemed to be painting Governor Romney as a lightweight on foreign affairs.

"Every time you've offered an opinion, you've been wrong[.] Your strategy previously has been one that has been all over the map," declared President Barack Obama.

"Attacking me is not an agenda," said Mitt Romney, (R) Presidential Nominee.

The governor agreed with President Obama on key issues. Like ending the war in Afghanistan and keeping our military out of Syria.

He steered clear of criticizing the administration on Libya after a mistake last time.

And he argued sanctions on Iran came too late due to weak leadership. "I look around the world; I don't see our influence growing around the world. I see our influence receding." "We can't kill our way out of this mess," declared Mitt Romney, (R) Presidential Nominee.

Governor Romney said it's because we've got a smaller military, fewer ships. "Governor, we also have fewer horses and bayonets," said President Barack Obama.

What if any impact did this final debate have on undecided voters? "Romney agreed with the President a lot and there wasn't a distinction between them," said Undecided Voter David Wildes.

"I was hoping in this debate that he would've said something that would make me feel how I did four years ago and he didn't," said Undecided Voter, Joe Kotvas.

Some voters are still undecided, with two weeks to go.

Tracie Potts, NBC News.

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